What the BC technology industry really needs

Gary Mason had a great article in the Globe and Mail yesterday analyzing the performance of some of the BC government organizations charged to drive forward the tech sector in this province. And this paragraph probably sums it up best:

There are many well-meaning and hard-working people at both the innovation council and Premier’s technology group. But it’s time to take a hard look at both organizations with an eye to reassessing their roles and either getting rid of them altogether or giving them higher profiles and more focus.

While I agree that fewer and better focused government organizations are certainly a good thing, I also think that the ONLY thing that will substantially change the trajectory of the local tech industry will be more entrepreneurs and more start-ups. The government needs to start focusing on initiatives that will either get more talent into BC or get more local talent to start new companies. So support initiatives like Startup Visa Canada that aims to attract the best and brightest entrepreneurs from around the world to this country; support accelerators with great mentorship programs that help first-time entrepreneurs get their idea off the ground; and implant entrepreneurship more into the curriculum of schools and universities. What we certainly don’t need are more high-level reports about where we stand as an industry, more government run events or more programs where the beneficiaries are only people in the know.

There is some great traction developing here in BC, there is a new generation of amazing entrepreneurs emerging, and the engineering and design talent base is as deep and wide as in most other markets. Let’s just put the foot to the gas pedal and create more entrepreneurial activity. Much, much more entrepreneurial activity.

 

Full discloser: I am one of the initiators of Startup Visa Canada and also one of the co-founders of GrowLab, a Vancouver based start-up accelerator.

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  • Pieter Dorsman

    Agree with everything here. One of the key points
    you highlight is an overhaul of our education system which still trains most students
    for a ‘job’. As we are seeing in
    the US and this phenomenon will visit Canada too, is that no amount of
    government stimulus or government programs will accelerate a local economy changed
    by a fundamentally different world economy. Jobs as we know them will change
    and therefore we need to raise a new generation for whom entrepreneurialism comes
    as naturally as did careerism for those that grew up before. Entrepreneurs who work will flexibly, multi-task,
    and above all: assume risk.

  • Anonymous

    Fully agreed – creating more entrepreneurs is something that needs to happen in all industries, no only tech.